Monday, 2 July 2012

Norris rebate mitre plane revisited


This is a plane that I did not think I would have an opportunity to make again. I was delighted when a customer asked if I would be able to make an African Blackwood filled version. I decided to make a second one along side it, and build it a few steps ahead to avoid any misadventures... Murphy’s law and all.

Thankfully, I had kept all the original jigs, fixtures and notes from the first pair. I found myself referencing the original 'build' photos quite often - it was a good reminder of what I had done and went a long way to keeping Murphy at bay. 

 






















One of the biggest challenges was to decide on the infill material for the 'spare'. I have this very old Kingwood plank that seemed like a good choice. Kingwood is one of those species that is really quite rare - especially in dimensions suitable for planes. I needed stock 2-1/8" wide for the infill and the plank was 9/4. It was perfect.










 


There are only 2 modifications to this pair of planes when compared to the first pair. The end of the wedge was cut square on the first pair (as it was on the original Norris plane). I thought it would look nicer if the end of the wedge matched the radius on the iron and the bronze pivot block.

The second change is so minor that you can only see it if you remove the screw in the keeper - I chamfered the hole.  The bronze post that houses the screw is at an angle and when the post is flushed with the infill, the threads looked a little odd. The chamfer cleaned it all up.






 

















When I cut into the Kingwood plank - it was not exactly what I was expecting. There were some orange tones in it - something not typical in Kingwood. I contacted my usual list of exotic wood guru’s and one of the guesses was Cocobolo. The orange was more typical for Cocobolo but the smell was wrong and it planed beautifully. It planed like a dense Walnut which is not how I would describe planing Cocobolo. Another friend had what I took to be the best advise. He said that there are thousands of Rosewoods out there if you count all the cross pollinating and variations. His suggestion was that this was likely something in the middle, and at the end of the day - if the wood is beautiful and seasoned properly - then use it.



 






















With this pair of planes completed, I am going to take a bit of time to continue working on the dining room chairs. I am not sure how far I will get - but I will certainly post photos as I go.


10 Comments:

OpenID fairwoodworking said...

I really love these planes. A real example of where odd, and even (dare I say) ugly, is truly beautiful. You know what I mean right???

Can't stop staring at the Kingwood, or whatever it is...

2 July 2012 10:18  
Blogger Kevin Brehon said...

Wow, great work and beautiful wood as usual. I really liked the shot of the profile and it got me thinking: If you were to build this plane in your own style, keeping the mechanical elements intact, what changes would you make?

2 July 2012 10:20  
Anonymous Chris Bame said...

OK Konrad you got me on this pair.I haven't seen any thing like that before. What would they be used for?
Tell me more!!!
On another note I'm in upstate N.Y. realized on the way that I was going to be pretty close to you but...I forgot my passport.
Maybe I can visit another time. : (

2 July 2012 12:04  
Blogger Beachcricket (David Wall) said...

It looks elegant but really tough at the same time. A beautiful piece of work.

2 July 2012 12:15  
Blogger Konrad said...

yes fairwood - I know what you mean. And I agree with you. It is a bit of an odd duck - but it is pretty cool still... and all the mechanical aspects to the plane make it really fun to make. Lapping it on the other hand... not so much:)

Cheers,
Konrad

3 July 2012 12:26  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hi Kevin,

Hmmm... good question. It didn’t occur to me to try my hand at re-designing it. I will tuck that question away for later. My first thought would be to lower the center of gravity and really lower the location of the handle - bring it down.

Thanks for adding yet another item to bounce around in the back of my head:)

Cheers,
Konrad

3 July 2012 12:28  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hi Chris,

As far as use - any instance where you needed a really deep wide rabbet. The handle tilts left and right and pivots left to right as well. This would allow you to keep the hand on the rear handle out of the way.... but the plane is so tall, I am not sure what you might be cutting where you need that much clearance.

Drat - I am not that far from upstate NY. You are certainly welcome to stop in whenever you are close.

Cheers,
Konrad

3 July 2012 12:31  
Blogger Konrad said...

Thanks David - glad you like it.

Cheers,
Konrad

3 July 2012 12:31  
Blogger pjped said...

Dude, you're my hero.

19 July 2012 19:22  
Blogger pjped said...

Dude, you're my hero.

19 July 2012 19:23  

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