Thursday, 24 April 2008

A very rare piece of wood finds a home



I will admit it - I am quite spoiled with some of the infill wood I have. Rosewood tops that list - but a while ago, I ran into a piece that stopped me dead in my tracks. It was a small section of burl. There was not much, and I had to really work to get enough for an XSNo.4.



And even after it was roughed out- I was not 100% sure I had captured enough of it. About a month ago, I started the plane. As I was working away I realized this piece was spectacular.



What sometimes happens is the figure and curl of the wood disappears as you cut it down and fit it to the metal shell. This piece was the reverse. With every cut - the infill kept getting better and better. There was a great light patch of wood on the rear infill that I really wanted to keep. I cheated the rear infill as far to the right as I could to capture as much of that patch as possible. You can see the patch in the photo below.



The front bun was equally spectacular - despite its small size.



This piece of burl was a very rare find. I cannot promise to find another one like this - but there are a few other large pieces that look promising. I just feel lucky to have found this piece.

7 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Konrad,

Just like pulling a rabbit out of your hat! Ye, you are truely a magician!

Michael

PS - That's pretty much the way I want mine to look.

24 April 2008 at 21:16  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hi Michael,

Thanks - glad you like the plane. It was a pretty awesome one.

Cheers,
Konrad

25 April 2008 at 06:04  
Blogger Chris said...

Wow. Incredible. Rosewood has quickly become my favorite turning wood.

But, I hate to be the one to point this out--your last entry promised that the next photos would be of the mystery plane...

Keep up the good work!

25 April 2008 at 09:59  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

How about a post showing off your lumber stash?? *drool*...

26 April 2008 at 15:04  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hmmmm.... lumber stash. Let me think on that one.

26 April 2008 at 15:26  
Blogger Jim Shaver said...

I've seen the "stash" ... somethings need to been seen to believed and don't photograph well....and that stash is just that, SURE JIM....lol!!

26 April 2008 at 19:03  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Konrad is being modest about the performance of this little plane. It carries the strength and power of a bench plane on a small frame. The right size for small work or details like marquetry. Puts your hands right over the work, and the feedback is coming up into your hands all the time. With or against grain. One hand or two. It'll be a most-used tool!

Specs:

Length/width: 5-1/2" x 1-3/4"
Blade width: 1-7/16"
Heft: Hefty!
Bedding angle: 52-1/2 degrees
Mouth gap: 1-1/2 to 2 thou

Wiley

29 April 2008 at 21:27  

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Sunday, 20 April 2008

The front view & a wicked keeper



The next photos will be of the finished planes - I promise.

8 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Konrad,

I like the logo stamped into the end grain at the toe. You should consider doing that with some of your other planes.

Dan

21 April 2008 at 07:54  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Miter Plane

21 April 2008 at 11:01  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

which one is yours?
Brazillian one is wicked.

tom

21 April 2008 at 17:38  
Blogger Louis. said...

recreation of the one off norris sold by tony murland in the u.k. last summer.

23 April 2008 at 04:39  
Blogger Dan Barrie said...

are there going to be a set of wheels to go with that pair of beasts?

23 April 2008 at 12:29  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hi Dan,

There are a few other planes that get stamped on the toe. If there is a lever cap - that gets the stamp. Otherwise, the infill on the toe gets stamped.

Cheers,
Konrad

25 April 2008 at 06:05  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hi Tom,

The Ebony plane was the commissioned version - and I am going to be selling the Brazilian “prototype”.

Cheers,
Konrad

25 April 2008 at 06:07  
Blogger Konrad said...

Hi Louis,

You are correct! There have been a few people that figured it out. I will be posting the photos in the next entry - promise.

Cheers,
Konrad

25 April 2008 at 06:08  

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Saturday, 19 April 2008

Two wedges & a handle



4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Haha, these things are ridiculous!! You sure know how to keep people in suspense!!

-Ryan C.

19 April 2008 at 15:39  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Konrad,

Are you making a tilting handle infill rebate plane? Are you making two of them? Wow! How cool! I was going to ask you if you were interested in making one of those. Looks like someone beat me to it. I can't wait to see them.

Dan

19 April 2008 at 16:08  
Blogger jyatulis said...

Hi Konrad,

At first I thought it might be for a massive Spiers carriage rebate plane, but now... I think we are all guessing!

cheers,

Jay

19 April 2008 at 16:55  
Blogger Chris said...

You are an insufferable tease!

20 April 2008 at 16:36  

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Friday, 18 April 2008

No - this was not a “scaling” exercise in Photoshop.


They really are that big!

These are the irons for a rather unique pair of planes I have been working on for the last 12 months. One iron is for the commissioned plane - the other for the spare “prototype”. The pair should be completed in the next few days - stay tuned...

4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Are you building a guillotine?

Dan

18 April 2008 at 17:49  
Blogger Konrad said...

That's pretty funny Dan. It would be a slow moving one - note the holes for an adjuster:)

Cheers,
Konrad

18 April 2008 at 20:25  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Nah, the adjuster is just to precisely set how deep the guillotine enters the choping block following its descent!

Massive blades, Mr. K. Nice intrigue you've snared us in so we watch the blog that much closer.

Cannot wait to see/read what the blades are for.

Take care, Mike

19 April 2008 at 09:08  
Anonymous Michael Rogen said...

Well Konrad the shape of the iron should really help with this riddle that you have conjured up, but I'm not sure.

Take care,

Michael

19 April 2008 at 12:20  

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Wednesday, 9 April 2008

Magic drawer No.13


An hour ago, the 16th and final drawer was installed. What a feeling. I have been working on the last 4 drawers for a week or so. One of them was a monster at almost 12" deep. Drawer number 13 was pretty significant - it was the first one where all the dovetails fit right off the saw. Drawer No.14 had one corner that needed a bit of paring, but 15 and 16 (the monster drawer) were also off the saw. I took a pile of photos of drawer No.16 being built - it will be the subject of “Some thoughts on dovetails - part II”. The “Red-Robbie” pulls are just temporary until the African Blackwood pulls are done.

Here are a few pics of the three banks of drawers in the kitchen.





I think I can hear Jill blissfully filing Tupperware. Next up on the home reno front - back to the sunroom...

5 Comments:

Blogger Mike R said...

Konrad,
Well done indeed! I can (as I told you last time) talk dovetails all day long and I'm thrilled that you've decided to go through with the dovetails Part 2.
How good did it feel going from saw cut to assembly without all the paring and triming that usually takes more time than it did to cut the thing in the first place? I've had that feeling only once or twice and only because I forced myself not to touch the piece that I had just cut for fear of screwing it up.
Really nice job Konrad.

Take care and I've sent yo a pm as well.
Michael

9 April 2008 at 21:48  
Anonymous Spencer said...

I'm especially impressed with the quarter column detail. (not too mention the awesome dovetails!!)

Nice work!

10 April 2008 at 19:19  
Blogger MorningWood said...

Very nice! My wife wants a new kitchen in the future and I was contemplating using dovetails in the drawers. Now that question is a no brainer as your drawers are stunning. Thanks for sharing those pictures.

Eric

11 April 2008 at 06:52  
Blogger Sam Correa said...

Wow...Hand cut half blinds throughout the whole kitchen...Great work, I dig the thin pins!

25 April 2010 at 04:40  
Blogger Konrad said...

Thanks Sam! And thanks for commenting on this very old post.

Cheers,
Konrad

25 April 2010 at 08:24  

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Tuesday, 8 April 2008

sweet rebates!


First off - let me apologize for not posting anything for a few weeks. I have been pretty busy in the shop - working on some very cool planes and some “other work”. I will be posting about it in the next few weeks.

I have recently completed a set of 4 rebate planes - 1/2", 3/4", 1" and 1-1/4" widths. The sides and sole are 01 tool steel and the infill is Rosewood. It has been a while since I have made a set of these - and I have to say it was a lot of fun.




They are a matching set in that all the Rosewood came from the same piece - but I tried to maximize some of the figure by using it where it will be most visible. The 1-1/4" rebate is a good example with that wonderful swirl at the front.







Most of the wedges have either some burl or curl in them.


8 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Wow!

Konrad,

That's some beautiful figure! Nicely done.

Have you ever considered incorporating some type of nickers for cross grain work? Have you ever considered making a dado plane (or a set)? If so, would you consider sending them to Massachusetts?

Dan

8 April 2008 at 18:23  
Anonymous Eric said...

Awesome! How do you do that! Absolutely stunning work.

8 April 2008 at 19:11  
Blogger Konrad said...

Thanks Dan.

Funny thing about “English” infill rebates - they never had nickers. There is a very fine line between infill shoulders and infill rebates - the only distinctions being the obvious shape differences and bed angles. Shoulders are usually in the 20 degree range and often with finer mouths while rebates have higher bed angles. From what I have gathered - those are the only differences between the two types. No wonder rebates are often called shoulder rebates!

All that being said - it might be fun to put a nicker on one... great, another variation to add to the list:)

best wishes,
Konrad

9 April 2008 at 07:26  
Blogger Konrad said...

Thanks Eric - glad you like them.

Cheers,
Konrad

9 April 2008 at 07:27  
Blogger stephen said...

The picture at the top of the new rebates post is amazing. you are very handy with a camera sir.

Stephen K.

9 April 2008 at 19:27  
Blogger Konrad said...

Thanks Stephen. I suppose my years working with photographers has rubbed of a bit:)

Cheers,
Konrad

9 April 2008 at 19:58  
Blogger Konrad said...

hmmm... it appears I can't type though. That would be “rubbed off a bit”

9 April 2008 at 20:00  
Blogger jyatulis said...

Hi Konrad,

Very nice set! The figure in the wood is beautiful. I love the large pictures, it lets you get right into the detail. If you are cutting the infills from the same stock piece, either for book matched or not, how long do you leave them sit before encorporating them into the plane? Are you checking them with that nice new moisture meter?

cheers, Jay

9 April 2008 at 22:00  

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